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Two Corvettes pulled from Corvette Museum sinkhole, one manages to start

Eight Corvettes are being rescued from a freak sinkhole as the Internet watches every move.

By Clifford Atiyeh Mar 3, 2014 1:41PM
It's been nearly three weeks since a massive sinkhole ripped out the floor of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky., swallowing eight pristine sports cars and causing millions in damages.

Now, as photos, drone videos, webcam streams and countless posts across social media can attest, the first Vette was pulled out of the rubble some 30 feet below: a 2009 "Blue Devil" ZR1.

"It's wonderful ... just seven more to go," Mike Murphy, the museum's construction manager, was quoted saying on its blog.

Crews were extra careful lifting the 638-horsepower supercar from the wreckage, fitting it with extra straps in case the wheels fell off. But the ZR1, which originally sold for about $111,000, fired up after a few tries and drove out the museum door, although it was quickly shut off after fluids were found leaking from the undercarriage.

A 1993 Corvette 40th Anniversary Edition, nicknamed "Ruby," was the second car to get pulled out as of this afternoon. Needless to say, Ruby didn't start. A 1962 Stingray, the 1 millionth Vette built for 1992, a 1984 PPG Pace Car, a 1993 Corvette ZR-1 Spyder concept, a 2001 Mallet Hammer and the 1.5 millionth Vette built for 2009 are waiting extraction. (Catch the cars as they emerge on the museum's Facebook page.)


The museum, just across the street from the Corvette assembly plant in Bowling Green, has brilliantly turned the tables on what should have been a catastrophic insurance nightmare and lost ticket sales. Instead, they turned the accident into a public relations sensation. Of course, had anyone been in the museum after hours when the sinkhole emerged, things wouldn't have been so lighthearted and fun to watch. But since not a single person was hurt, it's a show the Internet has been watching nearly every day (and given the attention span of the Internet, that's impressive).

General Motors, in a PR coup of its own, will pay to restore all of the eight Corvettes that fell into the hole, but not before the museum displays the damaged cars with a special sinkhole exhibit this August. Hopefully, they'll make the floor a bit sturdier, because repeats like this, no matter how awesome they might appear on YouTube, may cause the entire building to be condemned.


30Comments
Mar 3, 2014 2:53PM
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Now if we cold just get one of these holes to open up under congress while it's in cession. And, have heavy equipment standing by to back fill it in a hurry! I personally would like to be at the edge of the hole to show the president, and then push him in with them! We could get a group of fifth graders to take their place and be much farther ahead than we are right now!
Mar 3, 2014 2:18PM
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It causes me to wonder about the safety of the whole area. Major highway running beside the museum?? Any testing being done to attempt to insure  driving safety in the area???
Mar 3, 2014 2:55PM
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This has to be related to earth warming.

                   -Al Bore

Mar 3, 2014 2:57PM
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Mr. Sanders,  sometimes Mother Nature is in charge.  Environmentalists can rest easy over this event.  That area is a bit prone to sinkholes and has numerous famous cave systems in the surrounding area and there hasn't been any of that "shudder" fracking going on. 

 

 

Mar 3, 2014 3:33PM
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The damaged Corvette display is totally wrong.  Fix the old girls up and display them in their glory.  Don't display them in the current damaged state.  The line has a proud heritage, show them some dignity.
Mar 3, 2014 3:14PM
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Underground aquifers are being drained faster than Nature can replenish them. Take all of the water out from underneath, and the surface caves in. Doesn't take a brain trust to figure that out. The cave may or may not occur in the immediate vicinity of the water draining process.

 

As we have more people and more development, more water gets sucked from below, therefore more surface cave-ins.

 

Same applies to oil and gas extraction. It's a big old planet, but the laws of physics still apply. No one wants to recognize it for fear of losing the money that flows coincident with the extraction.

Mar 3, 2014 3:21PM
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This has a special GM commercial swirling around it.  
Mar 3, 2014 3:17PM
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I heard they are being sold at "ROCK BOTTOM" prices  !!   

Mar 3, 2014 4:20PM
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I've owned the same corvette for over 35 years, a 1978 year model.  That thing has been a sink hole since the day I bought it!  I didn't have it for more than six months before I decided I would never buy another new car again.  You know what they say!  Fool me once, shame on you...Fool me twice shame on me!  I never had the heart to sell that piece of junk to someone else so I hung on to it all these years.  When I finally get done with it (any time now), I'm going to have it crushed into a scrap block and ship it back to GM with a nasty gram informing them just exactly how unsatisfied I have been with the piece of crap they sold me!  It must have been one of those Friday cars and they used the Armed Forces European Exchange System to get rid of them.  Destroyed my childhood dream, they did!  Bud and Todd would turn over in their graves if they only knew!  And, I never did buy a new car again!
Mar 3, 2014 3:03PM
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How about a live cam for this event.  :)
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