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Postal Service unveils 5 muscle-car stamps

The artwork is great, but be careful -- soon they won't run on Saturdays.

By Clifford Atiyeh Feb 21, 2013 9:46AM
It's been 15 years, and I still won't forgive the U.S. Postal Service for destroying my 50th anniversary issue of Road & Track magazine. That thick, limited-edition copy arrived torn, taped and battered with a little yellow note on the cover stamped "Damaged in handling in the Postal Service."

If I had been dead, I might not have noticed.

But the Postal Service does like cars, and for that, I can at least give my mailman a nod. Starting Friday, the latest stamps from the series "America on the Move" feature five muscle cars from the late '60s and early '70s, each illustrated in rich color doing smoky burnouts.

Forever Muscle Car Stamps (c) USPSThe 1966 Pontiac GTO, 1967 Shelby GT500, 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona -- the production car with the tallest-ever wing -- 1970 Plymouth Barracuda and a 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS convertible can all be yours for $9.20. That's the price for a book of 20 "Forever" stamps, with four of each model. Stamp prices for first-class mail weighing 1 ounce or less went up one cent to 46 cents last month.

Stamps featuring '50s sports cars, including the first Corvette and Thunderbird, rolled out in 2005. In 2008, the '50s theme carried that era's obsession with tailfins and even put the rear end of a Pontiac Safari -- the lesser-known variant of the Chevy Nomad -- on a stamp.

It's true that a Toyota Camry and other moderate family sedans can outrun and outgrip most, if not all, of these muscle cars. But to dismiss their relevance to American car culture -- which after all, shaped the very foundation of this country -- is to forget our rumbling, proud past. Even if most kids today can't drive stick, at least they'll be able to -- what? Kids don't mail physical letters anymore?

That's part of why the Postal Service, facing declining mail volume and a glut of overhead for its well-paid employees, is cutting Saturday letter delivery beginning in August.

At least a real GTO can run all week.

[Source: USPS]
19Comments
Nov 21, 2013 10:06AM
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This is a good move by the postal service to get the young ones to view and appreciate the older, classic cars, and to see where the new vehicles came from. It's always good to know the foundations of modern vehicles.

I really like he illustrations and details they put into this. Great Job.

http://www.junkcarsfl.com

Feb 24, 2013 2:08AM
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those are some awesome cars.....they dont make em like that no mo~!~!~


Yeah they do, but they cost way too much for the average person.
Feb 23, 2013 5:26PM
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those are some awesome cars.....they dont make em like that no mo~!~!~
Feb 22, 2013 6:17AM
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I think I'll buy a sheet of these for a framed display in my workshop.   
Feb 21, 2013 2:52PM
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I was under the impression the modern day stamps, much like baseball cards, are released in such high numbers they they will virtually never amount to much value wise. 

 

These would be fun to have just cause I think their cool, but I wouldn't count on them being worth a lot some day.

Feb 21, 2013 10:46AM
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BUY THESE STAMPS, and any other series the Post Office offers because like all other Government run businesses, this one is going to fail soon and those stamps will be worth much more when there is no such thing as a US Post office.
   The US P.O. has been on a downhill slide for years and stopping delivery on Saturdays is only the beginning of the end for it. The only chance for survival is for the Postal Service to become privatized and get the government out of the picture.
   The current administration has proven to be a complete disaster when it comes to doing what is financially best for our country and many experts are predicting a crash the likes of what we have not seen since WWII. The only difference is that we had the war production to pull us out during WWII, what will we have this time???
  The White House has been warned for years about the ability of hackers to take down our infrastructure, power grids, communication and banks. Thus far they have not led us to believe that they are doing much about it (look at China just getting caught hacking into over 100 of our biggest companies to steal tech), I hope I am wrong and that this incident wakes them up. How easy would it be for a country to take over another country that is broke, has no access to their banks, electricity and no ability to communicate? Scary ****.

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