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Video: Chris Harris drives the Nissan DeltaWing

The race car’s radical on-track physics are finally explained.

By Clifford Atiyeh Nov 4, 2012 3:14PM

Since the Nissan DeltaWing crashed at Road Atlanta several weeks ago, we’ve wondered how its radical, needle-nose design worked – and why anyone would attempt to race it. Thanks to our friends at Drive, we now know the skinny front wheels are supported by shocks no larger than those on a mountain bike.


That would be scary on a normal race car, but the DeltaWing is so light that it requires the barest minimum of metal and carbon fiber. The engine produces about 300 horsepower – equal to the average BMW 335i – yet it’s as fast as cars with double the output. U.K. journalist Chris Harris was lucky enough to drive the DeltaWing at Road Atlanta, where it violently flipped during a practice in October. Luckily, Harris brought it back in one piece. Watch the video after the jump.


In June, the car crashed at Le Mans and quickly retired from the world's most prestigious endurance race. So far, the Nissan team has had a tough time proving that this experimental car can win its class. After listening to the technical babble in this video below – and watching the car’s freakish silhouette zinging from corner to corner –  we’re more convinced the DeltaWing may indeed have its day.


[Source: Drive]
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