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More Details on Bentley's V8-Powered Continental GT and GTC

New models to debut in Detroit.

By Joshua Condon Dec 12, 2011 8:52AM
The V8-powered Bentley Continental GT. (Photo by Bentley.)The W12 engine is "the ultimate expression of Bentley's engineering strength" according to the manufacturer. But it also has recognized a need for different engine variants to satisfy tighter fuel-economy and emissions regulations and the demand for a sportier driving dynamic. In response, the Flying B plans to roll out V8 variants of its Continental GT and GTC models at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit next month.

The 4.0-liter 500-horsepower twin-turbo mill puts out 487 lb-ft of torque, which Bentley says is "available across virtually the entire rev range from 1700 to 5000 rev/min. It also can push the Continentals to a top speed of more than 180 mph, with a claimed sprint to 60 mph of less than five seconds. There's also a variable-displacement feature, first demonstrated on the Mulsanne, that allows the engine to operate on four cylinders when cruising and during light throttle use. The V8 is mated to a close-ratio 8-speed gearbox, which Bentley says offers a 6 percent efficiency gain. It has yet to release specific details, though the W12 variants use an automatic transmission with paddle shifters, and that's unlikely to change.

The V8-powered Bentley Continental GT. (Photo by Bentley.)Bentley will visually set apart the V8 variants with a black gloss matrix grille, a red enamel "B" badge, a 3-segment bumper with figure-eight exhaust pipes, black air intakes and a lower rear valance. There's also an exclusive Diamond Black color for the optional 21-inch 6-spoke alloy wheels (20-inch alloys are standard).

There are seven standard exterior colors and a Eucalyptus interior exclusive to the V8 Continentals -- though, in true Bentley fashion, the crew at Crewe can make your vehicle look virtually any way you can imagine it -- for a price.

No word on how much the smaller powerplant reduces the vehicles' heft. The W12 Continental GT coupe comes in at 5,180 pounds. Curb weight, pricing and official EPA numbers for the new models will be revealed at Detroit. Until then, take another listen to that intoxicating V8 growl.

The V8-powered Bentley Continental GT. (Photo by Bentley.)
[Source: Bentley.]


35Comments
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I would love to have a car like the Bentley. But  it won't happen  in my lifetime. A beautiful machine. Happy holiday's to the people who can afford to  buy it; My 98 Lincoln Continental is almost the same color; I will have to settle for that.
Dec 20, 2011 6:01AM
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Wow!  Such Jealousy!   What happened to America?  Old America:  "What a beautiful automobile!  I'll work hard, become an entrepreneur, create something, sell something and have a goal to strive for to make myself more valuable to the market place."

New America: " Let's hate anyone trying to succeed like Old America and just tax them to take care of our inept selves."

Dec 20, 2011 2:32AM
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I'm getting one for Christmas.......in my dreams.Smile
Dec 20, 2011 1:46AM
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BOY I SURE WISH I COULD AFFORD ONE OF THESE
Dec 20, 2011 4:45AM
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I can't afford such a vehicle...  But I would not turn down the chance to go for a ride!  It's gorgeous!Smile
Dec 20, 2011 2:06AM
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why all the hate? The Bentley is a much better looking car. There's a reason why those who can afford them aren't going around buying "a Caddy CTS-V or Ford Cobra ". Can't believe some idiot would even try to put those two cars in the same class with a Bentley. I'll assume that he's driven all three and isn't just running his mouth about how how poorly the Bentley performs.
Dec 20, 2011 2:30AM
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For all the Bentley haters and the fools who say "British garbage" I say, the reason these autos command a hefty price is because there are a few enthusiasts who can tell the difference between an assembly line m****duced cadillac or a Ford mustang and a hand made Aston Martin or Bentley Let me see, they make very few of their super cars and yet they are in business? If you don't like the British cars then don't sell your trailer and buy one. These foolish comments are made by folks who have never had the opportunity to drive a Bentley or an Aston Martin. Believe me when I say, If you ever drive an Aston you won't ever look at American sports cars again.
Dec 20, 2011 1:46AM
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BOY I SURE WISH I COULD AFFORD ONE OF THESE
Dec 20, 2011 6:18AM
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this is very nice, i may not have one now but i'm working on it, maybe even something better so look out world. i'll keep you posted on my progress.
Dec 20, 2011 4:52AM
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@William This is an arguement I have with my brother all the time... American cars are rarely made in America.  Components are hardly made here and the cars are commonly assembled in Canada or Mexico... Sad my Nissan was assembled in Tennesee, but Dodge can't see the logic in that. So by a 1976 Buick, comfortable, big engine, and so much fun on those dirt roads down by the crick.  
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